Wildland Fire Safety (3)

May 11, 2016 - 10:04 am

Chipping Program

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Wildand Urban Interface Chipping Program

 

 

Modifying fuels near a home in a high risk area is important to reduce fire behavior in the event of a wildfire. To help homeowners accomplish this task, the City of Rapid City will offer chipping of removed fuels for high risk neighborhoods by appointment.

This is not a debris removal, landscaping or cleanup project. The larger woody brush, small pines, cedars, junipers, and other overgrown woody brush material pose the greatest fire threat. Debris or landscaping described as unacceptable will not be removed. Piles mixed with unacceptable materials may not be removed. 

Guidelines

  • Your neighborhood must be within the City of Rapid City and identified as being at risk for wildfire. 
  • In 2012, priority will be given to neighborhoods in the Carriage Hills, Wildwood, Pinedale Heights, Chapel Valley and Skyline Drive areas.
  • Select a neighborhood representative to sign a stewardship agreement. ONE PERSON will sign up the neighborhood or portion of the neighborhood.
  • All participants MUST attend a neighborhood meeting with the fire department or an onsite consultation before the chipping date.
  • There must be at least 12 homes participating; no maximum.
  • Select a chipping date and submit a list of participating addresses at least 1 week prior to the selected date.
  • All piles must be ready by 8:00 A.M. on the first scheduled day. The crews will survey the piles and arrange for adequate labor to chip all piles.
  • Slash mulch will be hauled away for recycling or a full load can be left on-site for mulch when requested.

 

 

 What’s Acceptable?

Example of a pile not stacked correctly.

  • Woody limbs and branches only, up to 6” in diameter. 
  • Woody material must be clear of nails or wire
  • Hazardous woody material includes small pines, cedar, juniper, & other woody brush material that is over grown on the property.
  • Piles only
  • Piles must be stacked with cut ends facing the road.
  • Piles must be within 5’ of the roadway.
  • Limit pile size to 5’x5’x5’. No limit as to the number of piles
  • Slash mulch will be hauled away for recycling or a full load can be left on-site for mulch when requested.

What’s Unacceptable?

 

  • No construction or building materials
  • No bags
  • No trash, weeds, vines, flower stems, and other trimmings such as sticks and twigs
  • No root wads, dirt or rocks
  • No grass clippings or leaves
  • Do not combine piles with neighbors or haul in material from other neighborhoods.

 

 For more information on the chipping program, please contact Lt. Tim Weaver at (605)-394-5233.

May 11, 2016 - 9:58 am

Survivable Space Initiative

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Survivable Space Initiative 

WUIholdingsignSeptsurvivable space signs1

Homeowners, like this couple on the left, who improve the safety of their home and property from wildland fire may receive recognition from the city.

 

The Survivable Space Initiative works to create survivable spaces, meaning they are more likely to withstand a wildfire without intervention and direct protection by fire fighters. During a large wildfire event, fire fighting resources may not be able to protect all properties.

Rapid City homeowners who meet minimum standards in protecting their property from wildland fire may receive the Survivable Space Initiative recognition which includes a plaque to post on the property and a certificate.

Interested homeowners in Rapid City may contact Lieutenant Weaver This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by phone at (605)-394-5233 to schedule a no cost, no obligation review of their property. Lieutenant Weaver will make suggestions for improvement, if needed, and discuss possible grant opportunities to help defray costs.

Homewoners in high risk areas may also request a chipper and crew remove piles of smaller wildfire fuels in their community. To learn more, click here.

Lieutenant Weaver is happy to speak with homeowners associations or neighborhood groups about the Survivable Space Initiative. 

May 11, 2016 - 9:44 am

Wildland Fire Safety- Home

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survivable space signs1
The sole purpose of a Wildland Fuels Mitigation Plan is to limit fire spread and limit loss within the Wildland Urban Interface, where wildland and development meet.
 
The Survivable Space Initiative works to create survivable spaces, meaning they are more likely to withstand a wildfire without intervention and direct protection by firefighters. During a large wildfire event, firefighting resources may not be able to protect all properties. Click here to learn more about this initiative.
 

Most homeowners are aware of their danger but need guidance and cost assistance. The Rapid City Fire Department works with the South Dakota Department of Agriculture and the local Great Plains Fire Safe Council to make education and grant money available to homeowners. 

Interested homeowners in Rapid City may contact Lieutenant Weaver This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by calling (605)-394-5233  to schedule a no cost, no obligation review of their property. Lieutenant Weaver is happy to speak with homeowners associations or neighborhood groups.
 
Cost assistance may be available for you hire a contractor to remove large fuels or to bring a chipper to your neighborhood to remove smaller fuels. Click here for more information on the chipping program.
 
Preparing for a wildfire also includes knowing your escape routes, assembling emergency supplies and belongings in a safe spot, and having a plan to reunite with your family after an evacuation. We remind homeowners to stay aware of the latest news on the fire from local media and the fire department, always follow their own personal action plan, and leave early.
 

Communities in Rapid City are receiving national Firewise Recognition for their ongoing efforts to make their neighborhood more resistive to fire. Check back later to learn more about those communities.

To read our Open Letter to Homeowners, please click here.

WUIAllenBefore

Before: Fire can easily spread from the grass to the trees and to this house.

WUIAllenAfter

After: The space is survivable due to the non-combustible roof and siding, the low vegetation near the house, green grass barrier, and an open tree canopy.

 

WUIGreenSpace

 Open, well-maintained areas can create a barrier between the fire and the home.

 

WUIScreenedLattice

Screening under the deck helps to prevent flying embers from smoldering in debris near the home, preventing a common cause of wildland urban interface fires. 

WUIChristensenBefore

 

Before (above): Dense undergrowth can quickly spread a fire into the trees and to the home.

After (below): Thinning produces a clean, safe, and park-like setting.

WUIChristensenAfter

 

 

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