Fire is Everyone's Fight (6)

September 16, 2016 - 11:02 am

School Safety Lessons

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The Rapid City Fire Department teaches age-appropriate safety lessons in each elementary class. Below are disucssion ideas and videos to enhance our lessons. Learn more about fire safety here.

Preschool

We learned:

  • Some things are hot, some things are sometimes hot, and some things are cold. 
  • Ask an adult before touching things that are sometimes hot, like bath water or food.
  • Tell an adult if you find something that is hot and dangerous, like a lighter or matches.
  • Adults should keep fire tools out of reach and out of sight, preferably in a cabinet with a child lock. 

For more, check out videos about things that are hot, cold, and sometimes hot as well as story apps and games at http://sparkyschoolhouse.org/#music-section

Parent Letter

 

Kindergarten

We learned:

  • Different alarms make different sounds but most home smoke alarm go beep, beep, beep, pause, beep, beep, beep, pause. What sound does your smoke alarm make?
  • When the alarm sounds: 1) Get up and walk, don't run, but you should walk briskly, 2) remember to know two ways out of every room, 3) get yourself outside quickly, and 4) go to your Outside Meeting Place with your family.
  • A good Outside Meeting Place is one place that everyone can find in an emergency. It is best in front of your house, a little away from the house but doesn't need to be further than the sidewalk. A mailbox, tree, sidewalk, driveway, or sign can all be good meeting places.

We watched:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OVHhkqpZf8

Parent Letter

For more, check out videos, story apps, and games at: http://sparkyschoolhouse.org/#music-section and a fire escape social story at http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/by-topic/safety-in-the-home/escape-planning/i-know-my-fire-safety-plan-story

 

First Grade

We learned:

  • Seatbelts should fit across our shoulder, chest, and hips the entire ride. Our knees should bend over the end of the seat.
  • We can use a booster seat to make the seatbelt fit right. We need a booster seat until we are 4' 9" or the belt fits right the entire ride.
  • We need to be alert when we are walking in a parking lot, sidewalk, or on the side of the road.

We watched:  "Walk This Way": Pedestrian Safety for Young Children at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-t2oX6zQEyU 

For more, check out: Safe Kids USA Ultimate Car Seat Guide at https://www.safekids.org/ultimate-car-seat-guide/ 

 

Second Grade

We learned:

  • Always wear a helmet when riding a bike, skateboard, scooter, roller blades or on similar wheels. 
  • Ride with an adult or older sibling when possible and ride on the side of the street.
  • Check for cars and people before crossing an intersection, alley, driveway, or road. 

We watched https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkoVxBnnGko

For more, check out: Johns Hopkins video comparing helmet to phone cases https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8qp8KZbqrM and Safe Kids USA bicycle safety at https://www.safekids.org/safetytips/field_risks/bike?gclid=Cj0KCQjwl9zdBRDgARIsAL5Nyn2kDHIS9RYpmXlJxgsV1jkCvACQApthBxTfWROMAkD70A-fIHcpq5EaAhqaEALw_wcB

 

Third Grade

We learned:

  • Fire is very fast. It is deadly in only two minutes and the entire room can be on fire in three to four minutes. It can take three minutes for fire fighters to leave the fire station from the time the 9-1-1 call begins.
  • When the alarm sounds, get up and get outside right away, and wait at our Outside Meeting Place. If you cannot get out immediately, wait in a room with the door shut. Use a window to escape if it is safe. If you decide to wait in a room, keep the door closed at all times. 
  • A good Outside Meeting Place is one place that everyone can find in an emergency. It is best in front of your house, a little away from the house but doesn't need to be further than the sidewalk. A mailbox, tree, sidewalk, driveway, or sign can all be good meeting places.
  • Fire sprinklers, interconnected smoke alarms, and a plan to escape can help when there is a fire.

We watched:House fire story on KDKA at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-cQKlT1SlI (we skip the introduction) and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RumCPC4rSw

Parent Letter

For more, check out: NFPA escape planning at http://www.nfpa.org/escapeplan

 

Fourth Grade & Fifth Grade (2018)

We learned:

  • Wildland fire can be very fast.
  • Youth age ten and older can be held legally responsible for starting a fire, even if they didn't mean to damage property or endanger lives.
  • Youth can prevent the majority of grass fires in Rapid City by helping friends to not start grass fires. 

We watched: *Turn OFF sound* https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7nprYdLM9E

Parent Letter

For more, check out: NFPA Wildfire videos for Middlle School at http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/campaigns/takeaction/wildfire-virtual-field-trips

 

Fifth Grade (2019)

We learned:

  • Fire sprinklers protect us from fire and give us more time to escape.
  • Alarms make different sounds to warn us of a fire, a carbon monoxide leak, low battery power, and when the alarm needs to be replaced.
  • How fire sprinklers and smoke alarms work and how to keep them working.

We watched: Fire sprinklers and speed of fire at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNfQFL96H9c, Fire sprinkler animation at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMNv7EOcFg4

Parent Letter

For more, check out: Chicago Fire of 1871 at http://sparkyschoolhouse.org/#music-section, NFPA on home smoke alarms at http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/by-topic/smoke-alarms/safety-messages-about-smoke-alarms, and Home Fire Sprinklers at http://homefiresprinkler.org/.

Sprinkler Smarts games and videos http://www.sprinklersmarts.org/grade_6-8/

People with Special Needs

We learned:

  • Fire is fast. When the alarm sounds, get up and get outside right away, and wait at our Outside Meeting Place. If you cannot get out immediately, wait in a room with the door closed. Use a window to escape if it is safe.
  • A good Outside Meeting Place is one place that everyone can find in an emergency and wait for help.
  • Fire sprinklers protect us from fire and give us more time to escape. They are important to protect people who cannot quickly escape alone.
  • Different alarms make different sounds to warn us of a fire; some even talk. If the sound of an alarm will not warn of us a fire, there are alarms with flahing lights when we are awake and alarms that vibrate the bed when we are alseep.
  • If there is fire in a pan on the stove, slide a lid or cookie sheet over the top and turn off the heat.
  • A fire extinguisher can put out small fires. Pull the pin, Aim at the base of the fire, Squeeze the handle, and Sweep from side to side (PASS).

We watched: Fire sprinklers and speed of fire at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNfQFL96H9c and a cooking fire story on WMAR at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0RgdYkc_Po

For more, check out: NFPA fire safety for people with disabilities: http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/by-topic/people-at-risk/people-with-disabilities

 

College and Other Adults

We learned:

  • Fire is fast. When the alarm sounds, get up and get outside right away, and wait at our Outside Meeting Place. If you cannot get out immediately, wait in a room with the door closed. Use a window to escape if it is safe.
  • A good Outside Meeting Place is one place that everyone can find in an emergency and wait for help.
  • Fire sprinklers protect us from fire and give us more time to escape. They are important to protect people who cannot quickly escape alone.
  • Different alarms make different sounds to warn us of a fire; some even talk. If the sound of an alarm will not warn of us a fire, there are alarms with flahing lights when we are awake and alarms that vibrate the bed when we are alseep.
  • If there is fire in a pan on the stove, slide a lid or cookie sheet over the top and turn off the heat.
  • A fire extinguisher can put out small fires. Pull the pin, Aim at the base of the fire, Squeeze the handle, and Sweep from side to side (PASS).

We watched: Speed of fire and sprinklers at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNfQFL96H9c, Fire sprinkler animation at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMNv7EOcFg4, Fire Extinguishers on ABC News at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hw4uIiXUCY4, Cooking fire story on WMAR at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0RgdYkc_Po

For more, check out: NFPA safety information http://www.nfpa.org/public-education and select topic of interest.

 

Check out our workplace and other lessons here

August 02, 2016 - 1:49 pm

Teaching Fire Safety to Others

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Volunteer – Volunteer to teach with the fire department as we visit classrooms, businesses, and community groups.

Children – Find fire safety lessons and resources for classrooms, homeschool, daycare, and preschool.

Businesses – Find fire safety lessons for your business safety class including evacuation and fire extinguisher use.

Fire Corps logo

Volunteer
We need volunteers to help us reach more people. We provide training. We need people to teach classes; update presentation materials including video, graphics, and Prezi; manage projects; write grants; and post on Facebook and other social media. Our volunteers are under the National Fire Corps umbrella. If interested, please contact Monica Colby at 605-394-5233 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Children & Youth
We recommend the lesson plans, videos, stories, apps, and games at http://sparkyschoolhouse.org/. Most of the lessons we use in schools can be found there plus much, much more. A fun and educational website for younger children is http://www.sparky.org/.

From September to December we offer fire safety and injury prevention classes to every elementary class, public and private, in Rapid City and the Rapid City Area School District. Learn more here

Workplace
We can teach a class at your businesses, hold a webinar for your employees, or you may prefer to use the online resources recommended below.

Our basic workplace presentation is embedded below.

You can also view the Prezi at http://prezi.com/07k7pfrmibsu/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share.

Fire Extinguisher 2 minute overview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLjoWjCrDqg 

Fire Extinguisher news report: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hw4uIiXUCY4

This YouTube video made by Austin Community College covers many evacuation concerns: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqwPyPlCOQkYour place of business may have different needs and evacuation capabilities. For example, few buildings have areas of refuge in Rapid City but some have elevators that are used for evacuation during fires.


Contact Monica Colby with questions or to schedule a presentation, 605-394-5233, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

August 02, 2016 - 1:32 pm

Prevent Cooking Fires

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FLSD Cooking page Cooking infographic

Cooking is the leading cause of fire in Rapid City. The good news is it is easy to prevent and keep from spreading.

Keep an Eye on What You Fry

Unattended cooking is the leading cause of home cooking fires. Stay in the kitchen when frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you must leave, even for a second, turn off the stove.

Select a stove with temperature limiting control technology burners such as induction technology or SmartBurner ™. These keep a fire from starting on your stove. Learn more here. You can also install knobs that use timers and/or motion sensors to prevent many fires. Learn more here.

If a fire starts, leave your home and call 911. If you have fire sprinklers, they will put out the fire.

If you do not have fire sprinklers, the fire is small, and everyone is escaping, then put on an oven mitt and slide a lid or cookie sheet over the pan, and turn off the heat. A fire extinguisher may work. Do not move the pan or the lid until the pan is cool enough to touch with your bare hand. 

August 02, 2016 - 1:17 pm

Home Fire Drills

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It is important that everyone know two ways out of the house. It is more important to have a plan on how you can help everyone be safe. Until about age ten, children will often need help during such a scary and stressful event as a fire. Plans need to be made to protect those who may not wake to the alarm or who cannot get out on their own.


pdf Download a family home escape plan here. (876 KB)

Learn more, including what to do if you live in a dorm or tall building.


1. When you hear the sound of the alarm, stop what you are doing and walk outside,
2. Know two ways out of every room,
3. Get outside quickly, and
4. Wait at your Outside Meeting Place.

A good meeting place is in front of the home, a little distance from the building. Sidewalks, trees, and mailboxes are common Outside Meeting Places. Have only ONE Outside Meeting Place that everyone can find. If you exit far from the meeting place, walk until you reach the meeting place.

If you are unable to get outside, stay away from the smoke and heat. Find a place with as many closed doors and walls between you and the fire. Once you have found a room without smoke or heat, close the door and always keep it closed. Call 9-1-1 if you can. Signal from a closed window if you can. Fire fighters will search the inside of every room when they arrive and move you to safety.

Fire is so fast we no longer teach the steps of staying low under the smoke or feeling the door. They are still good things to do but they don't work every time. A warm door indicates danger but opening a cool door can result death as the fire pulls oxygen out and pushes poisons in. The heat of the smoke forces most people to the floor. Near flashover, the flooring produces poisons. The process of feeling the door can make learning how to escape complicated. It is better to focus on preventing fires; install fire sprinklers; have interconnected, working smoke alarms; be able to make a quick escape; have a meeting place; and know how to create a safe place inside to wait for help.

August 02, 2016 - 1:09 pm

Home Smoke Alarms

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Working smoke alarms that will wake you are important. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room, outside each separate sleeping area, and on every level of the home, including the basement. Larger homes may require additional smoke alarms to provide a minimum level of protection.

Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home for the best protection. When one sounds, they all sound. Make sure you can hear the sound of the smoke alarm.

 

Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old. Replace any smoke alarm that does not respond after a new battery has been installed. Replace combination smoke-carbon monoxide alarms according to the maufacturer's recommendations.

Smoke alarms with nonreplaceable (long-life) batteries are designed to remain effective for up to 10 years. If the alarm chirps, warning that the batter is low, replace the entire smoke alarm right away.

For smoke alarms that don't have nonreplaceable or long-life batteries, replace batteries once a year. If the alarm chirps, replace the battery immediately.

Alarms are available for people who are deaf, people with significant hearing loss, people who use hearing aids but not when they sleep, and people who do not wake to the sound of a traditional smoke alarm.

When people who are deaf or people who use hearing aids are asleep, a pillow or bed shaker should be used. When people who are hard of hearing are asleep, a loud, mixed, low-pitched sound alert should be used. A pillow or bedshaker is a good idea. These devices are activated by the sound of the standard smoke alarm.

Learn more.

August 02, 2016 - 12:18 pm

Fire is Everyone's Fight

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Fire is Everyone's Fight logo with community hands helping the fire fighterFire is useful but uncontrolled it is dangerous and fast. It is so fast that the fire department cannot always get to the fire in time. We need everyone’s help to prevent and control fire. Help us by taking action to prevent fires. Know how to survive a fire. Volunteer to teach others to be safe with fire.

 

Fire Corps logo

Volunteer
We need volunteers to help us reach more people. We provide training. We need people to teach classes; update presentation materials including video, graphics, and Prezi; manage projects; write grants; and post on Facebook and other social media. Our volunteers are under the National Fire Corps umbrella. If interested, please contact Monica Colby at 605-394-5233 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Learn more about fire safety.

Prevent Cooking Fires

Cooking is the leading cause of fire in Rapid City. The good news is it is easy to prevent a cooking fire and keep fires small once they’ve begun.  Click the heading above to learn more. 

Install Home Fire Sprinklers 

Home fire sprinklers are the single most effective means to prevent death and injury from a fire. Sprinklers are especially important for those who cannot escape without assistance, those who may not hear the alarm when sleeping, and those with synthetic furnishings in their home. Click the heading above to learn more.

Teach Fire Safety to Others  

Find fire safety lessons and resources for classrooms, homeschool, daycare, and preschool. Find business fire safety resources. Volunteer with us! Click the heading above to learn more.

Stop Youth from Starting Fires 

While curiosity is a childhood trait, most youth do not play with fire and put themselves and those around them at risk. We can help you turn this curiosity away from dangerous fire-related behaviors. Click the heading above to learn more.

Keep Your Smoke Alarms Working 

Working smoke alarms that will wake you are important. Alarms should be installed on every level of the home, outside every sleeping area, and in every bedroom. For earliest notification, alarms should be connected so that when one sounds they all sound. Click the heading above to learn more.

Plan Your Escape 

Make sure everyone knows what to do when the alarm sounds and plan for those that will probably not escape on their own. Click the heading above to learn more.

Schedule a presentation

The Fire and Life Safety Division provides targeted education to improve the safety of our community. Our efforts aim to address the most common causes of fire, the most effective means of preventing fires and fire-related injuries, especially for those at highest risk of a fire-related injury.

To schedule a presentation about sprinklers, smoke alarms, escape, preventing cooking fires, older adult fire & fall prevention, or to schedule a safety class at your school, contact Monica Colby at 605-394-5233, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you are interested in other presentations about the fire department or would like to partner on initiatives other than those listed, please call 605-394-4180 to be directed to the correct division. 

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